What Biden’s Pakistan visit signals about US-led efforts in Afghanistan’s troubled neighborhood

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and CIA Director William Burns arrived in Pakistan on Tuesday, marking the Biden administration’s first high-level visit to the country since the chaotic withdrawal of US troops from neighboring Afghanistan in August.

The visit comes as the Biden administration seeks to reset its relationship with Pakistan, a key but often difficult partner in the fight against terrorism. The US has long relied on Pakistan for logistical support in Afghanistan, but the two countries have also had a rocky relationship, marked by mistrust and mutual recriminations.

Blinken and Burns are expected to meet with Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan and other senior officials to discuss a range of issues, including Afghanistan, counterterrorism, and economic cooperation. The visit is also seen as an opportunity for the US to gauge Pakistan’s willingness to support a regional approach to Afghanistan, which would involve working with other countries in the region to promote stability and prevent the Taliban from regaining a foothold.

The Biden administration has made it clear that it wants to avoid a repeat of the chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan, which led to the Taliban quickly overrunning the country. The US is now seeking to build a more sustainable presence in the region, and Pakistan is seen as a key partner in that effort.

However, the US-Pakistan relationship is likely to remain complex and challenging. Pakistan has its own interests in Afghanistan, and it is not always aligned with the US. The US is also concerned about Pakistan’s support for the Taliban, which has been accused of providing safe haven to the group.

Despite the challenges, the Biden administration is committed to working with Pakistan to promote stability in Afghanistan and the region. The visit of Blinken and Burns is an important step in that process, and it is likely to set the tone for US-Pakistan relations in the years to come.

Here are some of the key issues that are likely to be discussed during the visit:

* **Afghanistan:** The US is seeking to reset its relationship with Pakistan, which is a key but often difficult partner in the fight against terrorism. The US has long relied on Pakistan for logistical support in Afghanistan, but the two countries have also had a rocky relationship, marked by mistrust and mutual recriminations.
* **Counterterrorism:** The US is concerned about the resurgence of the Taliban in Afghanistan and is seeking Pakistan’s support in combating the group. Pakistan has a long history of cooperation with the US on counterterrorism, but it has also been accused of providing safe haven to the Taliban.
* **Economic cooperation:** The US is looking to expand economic cooperation with Pakistan, which is a major market for US goods and services. The two countries are also working together on a number of infrastructure projects, including the construction of a new gas pipeline.

The visit of Blinken and Burns is an important step in the Biden administration’s efforts to reset its relationship with Pakistan. The two countries have a long and complex history, but they share a common interest in stability in Afghanistan and the region.

The visit is likely to set the tone for US-Pakistan relations in the years to come, and it will be closely watched by both countries and the international community..

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